Treasure
Reaction score
900

Profile posts Latest activity Postings Post Areas About

  • Ever heard of the Go Go's? They are an all-girl band from 1978 to present day. I don't know a lot about their music, but I do know that as of today, they are the ONLY all-female band that writes and performs their own music to reach Number One on the Billboard Charts. That was in 1981. That's pretty special! And kind of sad.
    The first known novel is The Tale of Genji by Murasaki Shikibu, written in the 11th century. There are 54 beautiful and intricately crafted chapters introducing you to the world of the aristocracy of that time... until it stops mid-sentence. One translator says that's how it's supposed to end, and another says we're missing some pages. I don't know how they define "novel" considering there are
    The first commercial passenger flight took place in 1914 and consisted of Tony Janus the pilot and Abram Pheil the former mayor of St. Petersburg. Pheil paid $400 (8,500 in today's money) to fly across the water from St. Petersberg to Tampa, Flordia, and the flight paved the way for air travel as we know it! It also lasted only 23 minutes to cross 21 miles of water. Talk about an expensive puddle-jump!
    I'm not much of a sports person, but I have always found baseball to be one of the most tolerable. I'd especially find it tolerable if I got to sit in a rocking chair 20 feet behind home plate like how the umpires used to sit. Yep, umpires used to recline in rocking chairs in the 19th century, and that sounds pretty comfortable to me, although it did take until 1878 for them to get a minimum wage of $5 a game.
    Word evolutions are funny, fascinating, and weird. What can start out meaning one thing can mean something completely different a couple of hundred years later. For example, the word "Peculiar" used to mean "set apart, exclusive, singular." And the word "fizzle?" That we now use so innocently in the phrase, "fizzle out?" It originally meant, ahem, "to break wind quietly." I'll just leave that there.
    Steve Jobs, Steve Wozniak, and Ron Wayne signed the papers to found the Apple Computer Company on April 1, 1976 in their garage, but it wasn't fully incorporated until Jan. 3, 1977. Thirty years later, they renamed the company Apple Inc, and in 2018, it became the country's first trillion-dollar company. That's some April's Fool's joke! ;)
    In 2015, the Italian Space Agency worked with an Italian coffee maker to send coffee capsules and an espresso machine up to Samantha Cristoforetti in the International Space Station. So the first Italian woman in space gets the first coffee maker in space and becomes the first space barista! That's a lot of firsts. I'm still left wondering how she drinks that piping hot liquid in zero gravity...
    Who founded Father's day is still a bit of a mystery as three people have been credited, but most refer to a woman by the name of Dodd in 1910. In Thialand, Father's day is celebrated in December on the birthday of one of their kings, and in Germany, Fathers drink all day in beer gardens for celebration. In the USA, about 12.7 billion is spent on Father's day, and 21 billion on mother's day.
    Shovel combat. It exists. And is still practiced across much of the world (usually with props, like medieval combat practice sessions use fake swords), except Ireland, where a shillelagh is allowed but beating someone to death with a shovel is inhumane. Shovel combat. Huh. I wonder if there are any practice sessions near me?

    @KenżaSheep, thanks for teaching me something new!
    Imagine an aquarium. The first one to open was created in England in 1921 and opened in 1924 to give the average ticket-buyer a look at the deep blue sea! Jeanne Villepreux-Power invented the first recognizable glass aquarium in 1832, and the idea of preserving fishies in containers can be traced back all the way to Summaria, but the first aquarium for public viewing did not come into fruition until 1921.
    Treasure
    Treasure
    Bonus fun-fact, Aquarium is Latin for "watering place for cattle." Interesting choice for a building that often houses small sharks and giant meat-eating river fish for public viewing.
    GreenPhoenix3
    GreenPhoenix3
    What does that say about how they viewed the people going to the watering place?
    Treasure
    Treasure
    Now that's a funny take I did not think of!
    Fun Fact! One of the most famous classical composers ever never learned how to multiply or divide. Yep, Beethovan only knew how to add and subtract, meaning that one time when he needed to multiply 62 by 50, he wrote 62 down 50 times and added them all together. I don't wanna know how long that took. There, kids, a practical reason to learn maths in school. It makes your life just a little bit easier!
    Pigeon poop is the property of the British Crown, as of an 18th-century edict from King George the 1st. He even put guards at the common gathering places of pigeons to enforce that fact. Okay, as weird as that sounds, he had a good reason. Back then, pigeon poop was used in manufacturing gunpowder, so he was keeping the commoners pigeonholed. It's still gross and weird.
    Pretty much everyone knows, the Terminator movies, right? "I'll be back!" and all that. What's not as well known is the fact that the script for this famous franchise was sold for $1. The now-famous James Cameron sold the script for $1 and the promise that he'd get to direct it, and that movie was his big break to go on to direct a lot of other award-winning movies. Talk about paying off in the long run!
    Olympic long jump records! In 1900, a horse called Extra Dry set the as of yet unbroken record at 6.1 meters (about 20 feet). In 1991, Mike Powell set the record at 8.95 meters (a little over 29 feet). I don't know whether to make a joke about how a man can jump farther than a horse, the horse's name (Extra Dry? Really?), or the fact that no one has managed to beat these records in 120 and 29 years, respectively.
    Pig bladders. Gross enough by themselves without being turned into balloons, but even grosser when used to store paint. Which is what they were used for in the 19th century. Paint was poured in the bladder, tied with string, and poked to get the paint out. The biggest problem with this was their tendency to explode. Then American painter John G. Rand invented tin paint tubes with screw-on tops.
    The tallest birthday cake on record was 108.27 ft and was made by Hakasima-Nilasari Culinary School and was on exhibition from 28 November to 8 December 2008. The biggest birthday cake was made in 2005 for the 100th anniversary for Las-Vegas. It weighed 130 thousand pounds and was 34 yards long, 17 yards wide and 1.6 feet height. I'd like to be invited to that, please?
    • Like
    Reactions: SnapePotions34
    Treasure
    Treasure
    LA broke the previous record set in 1989 for the 100th birthday of Fort Payne, Alabama. It weighed 128 thousand pounds was 27 yards long and 10 yards wide. Ah, LA. Never to be outdone!
    In Elizabethan England, if you had a wart, you stuck a dead mouse on it. In Ancient Egypt, if you had a toothache, you stuck a dead mouse in your mouth. Sometimes as a paste (for either), sometimes just slap the little body on there. I don't have anything more to say on that, just let it sink in... a dead mouse... on your body... or in your mouth...
    Scientifically speaking, bumblebees absolutely cannot fly. They have too much body mass (read: fat) for their itty-bitty wings to lift them. I guess no one told the bumblebee since they have been flying just fine and higher then Mount Everest is tall. Here's a madcap thought: Maybe scientists have the wrong formulas?
  • Loading…
  • Loading…
  • Loading…
  • Loading…
Top